The Sarcophagus of Harkhebit was excavated by Service des Antiquités de l'Egypte in 1902, then purchased from the Egyptian government by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1907. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

The Beginning of the End

A Visit in Person

Harkhebit’s half smile. You can also see the beautiful linework on his beard and chest. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

Religion and State

Greywacke was reserved for highend art such as this God Horus Protecting King Nectanebo II, which was likely displayed in a sanctuary. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

The Prestige of Greywacke

Treasures Within

An example of finger and toe stalls. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.
An Ancient Egyptian funerary mask from the 18th Dynasty. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

A Popular Necropolis

A Thoughtfully Constructed Tomb

Picture by J.E. Quibell, Director of Government Excavations at Sakkara, in situ, 1902. The Met, Creative Commons.
Tiny Shabti workers. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

Deities of the Organs

Four surprisingly happy-looking canopic jars. Photo from The Met, Creative Commons.

Personalizing the Book of the Dead

An example of a Book of the Dead. Customized exerpts from Harkhebit’s Book of the Dead were engraved on his sarcophagus. Photo from The Met, Creative commons.

References

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